luzinterruptus

El plástico con el que vivimos / The plastic which we live with


Esta instalación trata de poner a la vista el uso masivo del plástico en nuestra vida doméstica.

Para llevarla a cabo elegiremos un edificio abandonado o deshabitado, y con bolsas cedidas por los ciudadanos, llenas de luz, intervendremos en todos huecos que dan a la calle,  de manera que parezca que el edificio está desbordado y a punto de reventar por la presión de las bolsas.

Esta instalación puede durar desde 1 día hasta varios meses, en los que las bolsas se irán deteriorando y mostrarán al público una imagen menos vistosa y alegre que los primeros días, lo que nos ayudará a mostrar de manera visual, el difícil envejecimiento del plástico tiene en el medio ambiente.

Las ilustraciones son como siempre de Marta Menacho.

——————————–

This installation is to bring into view the massive consumption of plastic in our everyday life.

To carry this out we will choose an abandoned or uninhabited building, with bags donated by the residents, filled with lights, we are going to fill in all holes that open onto the street, so that it appears that the building is overflowing and about to burst under the pressure of the bags.

This installation can last from 1 day to several months, during which the bags will deteriorate and will give the audience a less colorful and cheerful image than the first few days, which will help us to visually demonstrate, the difficulty that the aging of plastic causes for the environment.

The illustrations as always are by Marta Menacho.

Labyrinth of Plastic Waste / Laberinto de residuos plásticos. Shanghai 2023

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernandez

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Yuzhe-Xue-Wavelength

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Picture: Melisa Hernández

 

Last August, we were invited to Shanghai Roadside Festival to present one of our most iconic works Labyrinth of Plastic Waste which we have already installed in several cities around the world.

The idea of this work is still the same as on previous occasions: to bring attention, in a visual sensory manner, to our unsustainable consumption of plastic.

In order to do this, we built this huge labyrinth, the biggest one yet built, where visitors lose themselves in an intricate structure full of recycled plastic bottles which have been collected from the city. Our intention is to have this experience generate a thought, a conversation among the visitors which will hopefully bring them to reduce their plastic consumption and eventually make them aware of how they may dispose of it responsibly.

The first time we made this piece was in Poland back in 2014. We were trying to raise awareness of the need of recycling. However, 10 years later, it is clear that we must stop using it altogether. This looks like an impossible mission as governments lack interest and seem reluctant to pass laws to regulate this more potently. Unfortunately, priorities are still centered on the interests of companies, of businesspeople, of lobbies and of many voters whose main interest is to perpetuate their personal gain, disregarding the common good. As there is no restrictive law to penalize the rampant usage of disposable plastic material, any personal campaign may prove insufficient.

As regards our labyrinth, it was 40 meters long, 20 meters wide and 3 meters high (about 131 feet long, 65 feet wide, 10 feet high). Its length in a straight line was 400 meters (about 1,312 feet) and it took about 5 minutes to walk through it. However, we provided those who didn’t want to spend so much time inside with shortcuts, as the experience in there was quite oppressive.

The recycled bottles were collected by inviting people on social media to do so and by placing trash containers in public places for people to dump their waste there. In addition, volunteer groups and environmental organizations picked up trash at the beaches. Local packaging businesses also provided us with all the waste they could not use due to noncompliance with legal packaging requirements. We used a total of 90,000 units.

The structure was created with welded cross sections which were re-utilized once disassembled. At local workshops, we made the bags that contained the bottles with transparent tulle to avoid using more plastic.

The labyrinth was open to visitors from August 3 to August 13. It was located right in front of the Power Station of Art building. Once disassembled, the bottles were donated to companies that recycle plastic waste in order to manufacture new products. The remaining material will be used in new projects.

Our sincere acknowledgment to the recycling organizations: Ocean Cloud, Super Whale, HowBottle, One Planet Foundation, Circular Pi, Remakehub, Re:Generation, Bamboo Comet, for their help in obtaining the necessary amount of bottles to build the labyrinth.

Many thanks to Yuqi, Liya, Kris and Addrain from the PinKou Culture team who believed in us and our complex street art project and have handled the production wonderfully. Our thanks to Red, our sponsoring company. Special thanks to their curator, who stayed with us during the entire process, and to the museum for hosting us.

Last but not least, our appreciation to the photographers Yuzhe Xue and Melisa Hernández for capturing the magnitude and essence of our piece.

Time of installation: and installation: 5 days.
Damages: none.
Exhibition time: 10 day.

—————————

El pasado agosto fuimos invitados por el Roadside Festival de Shanghai para llevar a cabo una de nuestras piezas mas icónicas, «Laberinto de residuos plásticos» que ya hemos instalado en varias ciudades del mundo.

El sentido de este trabajos sigue siendo el mismo que en anteriores ocasiones, alertar de manera visual y sensorial sobre el insostenible consumo que hacemos de plásticos.

Para conseguirlo, hemos construido este gigantesco laberinto, el más grande hasta ahora, en el que los visitantes se ven obligados a perderse en una intrincada estructura abarrotada de botellas de plásticos recicladas y recolectadas del uso de la ciudad. La intención es que esta experiencia física, genere un pensamiento, una conversación entre los visitantes y ojalá, el propósito de reducir sus consumos de plástico, o como poco, poner cuidado a la hora de deshacerse de él de manera responsable.

La primera vez que hicimos esta pieza, Polonia en 2014, estábamos intentando concienciar sobre la necesidad de reciclar, pero casi 10 años después, ha quedado claro que lo primordial es dejar de consumirlo, algo que parece misión imposible por la falta de interés de los gobiernos, que se resisten a implantar políticas gubernamentales contundentes que legislen en este sentido. Desgraciadamente priman los intereses de la industria, de los empresarios, de los lobbies de poder y de muchos votantes interesados en perpetuar sus intereses personales, sin pensar en el bien común. Sin una legislación restrictiva que penalice el uso descontrolado de materiales plásticos de un solo uso, lo que hagamos a título personal parece insuficiente.

Centrándonos en nuestro laberinto, deciros que media 40×20 metros y 3 de altura, linealmente el recorrido completo era de unos 400 metros y se tardaba en recorrer aproximadamente 5 minutos, aunque pusimos algunos atajos para los que no querían pasar tanto tiempo dentro, que la experiencia era bastante agobiante.

Las botellas recicladas fueron recolectadas mediante convocatoria publica en redes sociales y situando contenedores en locales públicos en los que se invitaba a la gente a depositar sus residuos. Además grupos de voluntarios y asociaciones ecologistas limpiaron y sacaron material de las playas y por último, empresas de envasado locales nos proporcionaron todas las que iban a desechar por no cumplir los requisitos de envasado legales. En total usamos unas 90.000 unidades.

La estructura se creo con perfiles soldados que una vez desmontada la pieza se reutilizaron y las bolsas que contenían las botellas las hicimos en talleres locales con tul transparente, para evitar hacerlas de plástico.

El laberinto estuvo abierto al público desde el 3 al 13 de agosto, frente a la fachada de la Power Station of Art,  y una vez desmontado, las botellas se donaron a empresas de reciclaje de residuos plásticos, para fabricar nuevos productos. El resto de material se usara en nuevos proyectos.

Agradecimento total a las organizaciones de reciclaje: Ocean Cloud, Super Whale, HowBottle, One Planet Foundation, Circular Pi, Remakehub, Re:Generation, Bamboo Comet, por ayudarnos a conseguir gran parte de las botellas necesarias para construir el laberinto.
Muchas gracias  a Yuqi, Liya, Kris y Addrain del equipo de PinKou Culture que han apostado por nosotros en este complejo proyecto de arte publico, y han sabido lleva a cabo la producción de manera magistral.  A Red, la empresa que nos patrocinó, gracias especiales a su curadora que nos acompañó en todo el proceso y al museo por acogernos.
Por último no podemos dejar de nombrar a  los fotógrafos Yuzhe Xue y Melisa Hernández por saber captar la magnitud de la pieza y su esencia.

Tiempo de montaje:  5 días.
Daños ocasionados: 0.
Permanencia de la intervención: 10 días.

Picture: Melisa Hernández

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

 

 

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

 

Picture: Wavelength

 

 

(Plastic) Full Moon / Luna Llena (de plástico)

 

We saw that in China they had created a giant moon for dark nights, and we know of other artists who have used large stars in their work. So, without setting a precedent, we are not being totally original in proposing a large lunar sphere, although of course ours will be in «our style».

And the fact is that imagining the moon, full of all the plastic waste that we can’t fit on earth, is a not so dystopian hypothesis… we sense that the next trips to space will be loaded with everything that we can’t or don’t want to recycle in these civilised countries in which we live.

The piece will be very present in the city’s skyline, offering a surrealist vision that will be hard to forget. On the contrary, the intention is to make it look like something alarming and that while it hangs over our heads it is sending us messages that make us reflect.

We don’t want to show it just as a light show but as a warning from the sky of what we are losing, what we are generating and what we are degrading with the overexploitation to which we are subjecting the planet. It also raises the question of who will be the owners of these universes that are still uncolonised.

The moon will be raised by a large crane, which the public will perceive as part of the installation. This element is extremely important because it makes us think of all the natural life that is being lost and replaced by artificial scenarios perfectly designed according to the tastes of a society that demands spectacle and extraordinary experiences over real life.

To carry it out, we start from a giant ball formed by a light structure created from the modules. Each separate piece will be filled with plastic waste of all kinds, obtained from local consumption, which will be sewn into the mesh. When all the pieces are ready, they will be joined together to form our plastic moon.

It will then be elevated and illuminated with spotlights, which will change colour temperature to turn it into a golden sun during daylight hours.

Plastic Full Moon is a piece we devised in 2019 and since then we have been striving to bring it to fruition, as it gives a pertinent message in these times of lunar travel and excessive plastic rubbish.

We have now had the opportunity to further develop the project for the Lichtparcour Festival and our fingers are crossed that we can finally see it produced in Brunswick in 2024.

——————-

Vimos que en China habían creado una luna gigante para noches oscuras, y conocemos a otros artistas que han utilizado estrellas de grandes dimensiones en sus obras. Así que, sin que sirva de precedente, no estamos siendo totalmente originales al proponer una gran esfera lunar, aunque claro, la nuestra será a «nuestro estilo».

Y es que imaginar la luna, llena de todos los residuos plásticos que no nos caben en la tierra, es una hipótesis no tan distópica… intuimos que los próximos viajes al espacio irán cargados de todo aquello que no podemos o no queremos reciclar en estos países civilizados en los que vivimos.

La pieza estará muy presente en el skyline de la ciudad, ofreciendo una visión surrealista difícil de olvidar. Pero no va a ser precisamente simpática, al contrario, la intención es que parezca algo alarmante y que mientras cuelga sobre nuestras cabezas nos esté enviando mensajes que nos hagan reflexionar.

No queremos mostrar sólo como un espectáculo de luces sino una advertencia desde el cielo de lo que estamos perdiendo, de lo que estamos generando y de lo que estamos degradando con la sobreexplotación a la que estamos sometiendo al planeta. También lanzar la pregunta sobre quienes van a ser los dueños de estos universos que aun están sin colonizar.

La luna se elevará mediante una gran grúa, que el público percibirá como parte de la instalación. Este elemento es sumamente importante porque nos hace pensar en toda la vida natural que se está perdiendo y que es sustituida por escenarios artificiales perfectamente diseñados acorde a  los gustos de una sociedad que demanda espectáculo y experiencias extraordinarias por encima de la vida real.

Para llevarla a cabo, partimos de una bola gigante formada por una estructura ligera creada a partir de los módulos. Cada pieza por separado, se rellenará con residuos plásticos de todo tipo, obtenidos del consumo local, que irán cosidos a la malla. Cuando todas las piezas estén listas, se unirán para formar nuestra luna de plástico.

Después se elevará y se iluminará con focos, que cambiarán de temperatura de color para convertirla en un sol dorado durante las horas de luz.

Plastic Full Moon es una pieza que ideamos en 2019 y desde entonces nos esforzamos por llevarla a cabo, ya que da un mensaje pertinente en estos tiempos de viajes lunares y exceso de basura plástica.

Ahora hemos tenido la oportunidad de seguir desarrollando el proyecto para el Festival Lichtparcour y cruzamos los dedos para que finalmente podamos verlo producido en Brunswick en 2024.

——-

Plastic Blasts Coming Out of the Window / Ráfagas de plástico que se escapan por las ventanas

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

In our daily lives, we do not take the time to receive visual sensations that seem to be aimed at raising our awareness about the plastic that surrounds usand overwhelms us. Some months ago, we were actually shocked by the remodeling of an emblematic building in our city.

Prior to their installation, all the window gaps had been protected with plastic to keep the rain out. The wind gave the impression that this plastic attempted to escape from the interior creating a frenetic unsettling visual spectacle. This was enhanced by the deafening noise of the agitated plastic.

We thought that we would achieve a quite impacting piece if we could reproduce this moment with our lights. This was to be done with very little means. It would certainly move any viewer the way it moved us.

We present our first approach to this proposal. Giant curtains made of transparent recycled plastic scraps pouring out of the empty building like roaring plastic tongues lighted with projectors and shaken by powerful fans…

Who dares to follow us into this experiment? An empty building, recycled plastic, lights and fans… Itdoesn’t seem hard. Let’s see if it is feasible.

Illustrations by Lorenzo Martinez Zamora and Elena Baño Roig @ele.que.elen.

___________________

En nuestra vida diaria no paramos de recibir estímulos visuales que parecen destinados a ponernos en guardia sobre el plástico que nos rodea y nos desborda. Concretamente, hace algunos meses, nos quedamos extasiados mirando las obras de rehabilitación de un edificio emblemático de nuestra ciudad.

Y es que todos los huecos de las ventanas, aun sin instalar, habían sido protegidos con plásticos para evitar que la lluvia entrara en el interior, debido al viento, este plástico, daba la sensación de querer escapar del interior, generando un espectáculo visual frenético y desasosegante, acrecentado por el ruido ensordecedor del plástico en convulsión.

Pensamos que si logramos reproducir este momento con nuestras luces tendremos una pieza de alto impacto, hecha con pocos medios y que seguro remueve a cualquiera que lo presencie, tal como nos pasó a nosotros.

Y aquí dejamos una primera aproximación de la propuesta, visillos gigantes hechos con retales de plásticos reciclados transparentes, y que a modo de lenguas de plástico iluminadas con proyectores y movidas por potentes ventiladores, se escapan por las ventanas de un edificio vacío, y rugen de manera ensordecedora.

¿Quien se atreve a seguirnos en este experimento?, un edificio vacío, plástico reciclado, luces y ventiladores… no parece difícil, a ver si es posible.

Las ilustraciones son de Lorenzo Martinez Zamora y Elena Baño Roig @ele.que.elen.

Plastic Stuck in the Landscape / Plástico enganchado al paisaje











.

It’s been a while since we swing by here and say hello, an eternity it seems.

We stayed at home, taking that necessary break, thinking and trying to be safe. We found no reasons to leave the creative quarantine during the break though.

It’s time to get back to the world although we still are in a whirlwind of emotions and aren’t yet ready to artistically shape what we are experiencing.

However, we certainly think we need to go back to issues we left off that were themselves quite concerning and are still current unfortunately. We are of course talking about plastic consumption, a recurring issue in our work.

It consumption has alarmingly gone up during these months of lockdown due to the sanitary demand for protection material, the packaging of the food that arrived home, the massive online shopping… together with a widespreade lack of recycling awareness.

The idea “Plastic Stuck in the Landscape” isn’t new. It came to us while we were traveling and visited those marginal places that form the blurry limits between the country and the city, home of the countless amount of waste trapped in there and abandoned, mostly light plastic material carried by the wind. The climate degrades it and turns into shreds that are easily carried by the air until it gets stuck in something and stays there forever.

The effect is beautifully sad and alarming above all. One cannot escape its motion and sound although it is an unhealthy unnatural scene that evinces the damage this plastic waste causes in any environment which makes scared animals flee leaving the flora wither as there are no insects to pollinate.

This piece is easy to carry out. We just need a tree or a forest, a lot of plastic waste like bags, tarps or large pieces collected from neighbors, some powerful fans, and lights to illuminate the trees.

The plastic will be shredded in all sizes to be tied to the branches of the trees so that, when the fans are turned on, the wind will move it all and make it sound creating a beautiful unsettling soundtrack.
We hope to make it as soon as everything gets normally new and we can safely return to our activity in public places so everybody can join us.
The illustrations were created by our dear Marta Menacho.

………………………………………………..

Mucho tiempo desde que no pasábamos por aquí, tanto que parece una eternidad.

Estuvimos en casa, haciendo esa pausa necesaria, pensando e intentando cuidarnos. Durante el parón, no encontramos motivos suficientes para salir de la cuarentena creativa.

Es momento de volver al mundo, pero seguimos subidos a una montaña rusa de emociones, y no nos encontramos aun preparados para dar forma artística a lo que estamos viviendo.

Lo que sí nos parece necesario, es retomar lo que dejamos pendiente, cuestiones que ya eran muy preocupantes, y que desgraciadamente no han perdido un ápice de vigencia. Nos estamos refiriendo, por supuesto, al consumo de plástico, uno de los temas recurrentes de nuestro trabajo.

Y es que en estos meses de confinamiento, ha aumentado alarmantemente su consumo, debido a las necesidades sanitarias de material de protección de un solo uso, del envasado de alimentos que nos ha llegado a casa, las masivas compras online… junto a cierto grado de despreocupación generalizada por el reciclaje.

La idea “Plástico enganchado al paisaje” no es nueva, se nos ocurrió cuando viajábamos y nos encontrábamos en escenarios marginales, esas fronteras difusas entre lo rural y lo urbano en las que acaban varados miles de deshechos de los que nadie se ocupa, especialmente material plástico ligero, transportado por el viento. La climatología se encarga de degradarlo y acaba convertido en jirones que el aire transporta con facilidad, hasta que encuentra un obstáculo, y allí se queda, enganchado para la eternidad.

El efecto es tristemente bello, pero sobre todo alarmante. Uno no puede sustraerse a su movimiento y su sonido, pero en realidad se trata de una escena anómala e insalubre, ya que pone en evidencia el mal que esta basura plástica causa en un entorno, en el que los animales han desaparecido asustados y con ellos la flora, que se empobrece hasta morir, al no haber insectos polinizando.

La pieza es sencilla de llevar a cabo, se necesita: un árbol o un bosque, gran cantidad de material plástico, tipo bolsas, lonas, o grandes piezas, recolectadas del uso de los vecinos, varios ventiladores potentes y focos que iluminen los arboles.

El plástico se cortarán en tiras de todos los tamaños que se atarán a las ramas de los árboles y cuando los ventiladores funcionen, el viento lo moverá y hará sonar, generando una banda sonora bella y escalofriante.

Esperamos poder llevar a cabo esta idea en un futuro próximo, cuando todo sea ya normalmente nuevo y podamos retomar con seguridad nuestra actividad en el espacio público, junto a todos a que nos acompañen.

Las ilustraciones son de nuestra querida Marta Menacho.

.